Tad Talk.



WHAT'S IN THE BAG?

HALF SHARE

Omnivore Protein
 - Half Chicken from Feather Brook Farms; Yogurt from Brookford Farm
Pescatarian Protein - Salmon from Red's Best; Yogurt from Brookford Farm
Vegetarian Protein -  Plant Deli Sausage; Yogurt from Brookford Farm
Paleo Proteins -  Half Chicken from Feather Brook Farms; Eggs from Brookford Farm
Fruits and Veggies - Cucumbers and Blueberries from Busa Farms; Kale and Long Red Onions from Brookford Farm
Grain - Focaccia from Iggy's Bread 
Special Treat - Cookies from Forge Baking Co


WHOLE SHARE

Omnivore Protein - Whole Chicken from Feather Brook Farms; Yogurt and Eggs from Brookford Farm
Pescatarian Protein - Salmon and Haddock from Red's Best; Yogurt and Eggs from Brookford Farm
Vegetarian Protein - Plant Deli Sausage; Yogurt, Feta Cheese and Eggs from Brookford Farm
Paleo Proteins -  Whole Chicken from Feather Brook Farms;  Eggs from Brookford Farm
Fruits and Veggies - Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Cucumbers and Blueberries from Busa Farms; Kale and Long Red Onions from Brookford Farm
Grain -Focaccia from Iggy's Bread 
Special Treat - Cookies from Forge Baking Co


DOUBLE SHARE

Omnivore Protein - Whole Chicken and Italian Sausage from Feather Brook Farms; Yogurt, Feta Cheese and Eggs from Brookford Farm
Paleo Protein -Whole Chicken and Italian Sausage from Feather Brook Farms;  Pickles and Eggs from Brookford Farm
Fruits and Veggies -  Green Garlic, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Cucumbers and Blueberries from Busa Farms; Potatoes, Kale and Long Red Onions from Brookford Farm
Grain - Focaccia from Iggy's Bread
Special Treat - Croissants and Cookies from Forge Baking Co



RECIPES

Tad's Half Chicken: When asked what his favorite way to cook his birds is he replied : "Grilled Half Chicken with Onion Salt." That's it? Yup. That's it.

Kale Casserole
: Yeah, you heard us. Raw Kale is delicious but its scientific fact that butter, cheese and breadcrumbs make everything exponentially more tasty. Give it a go.

Sausage (Vegan or Non) and Kale Scramble:  This dish is more flexible than the cast of Cirque du Soleil. Open up the fridge and empty out any other veggies or herbs you want to throw in.  This could also become a simple weeknight frittata if you are overrun with heuvos.

Long Red Onions: In another nod to simplicity- the best way to treat these onions is to cut them in half, or quarters, coat in olive oil and grill. The taste is oniony perfection.  If you have 1,000 yellow onions sitting around the house, as we did, caramelize them in butter for 30 minutes. Thinly slice your focaccia and top with a bit of dijon mustard, add the onions and some grated cheese. You can nom immediately or put in the broiler to get that cheese all bubbly and happy.

Blueberry Pancakes:  There is nothing more pure than a perfectly griddled, warm and buttery pancake. This is a great vessel for the berries, if they survive Saturday afternoon uneaten.  This recipe is for the flapjacks from scratch but we keep a Whole Foods prepared pancake mix on hand for moments of abject laziness. 


TIPS AND TRICKS:

Oils work their way often into our recipes and at any given time we have several bottles different bottles on hand, each with their own role to play. The oil you choose and the job you give it in your kitchen can mean the difference between tragicomical and gastronomical. Here’s a quick guide:
 
Firstly, how hot is it in your kitchen?

Different oils have different smoke points. Using the wrong oil can leave your dish bitter and off-putting, so choose wisely:
Deep frying or broiling (400℉ plus) - you need an oil with a high smoke point, like expeller pressed or refined canola oil, sunflower oil, palm oil, peanut oil, soy oil, sesame seed oil, or avocado oil. Ghee also has a high smoke point.  
Roasting (300-400℉) - Many polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats do well at this temperature. Oils and fats like lard, butter, coconut, macadamia nut, vegetable, cottonseed, and hemp seed. Of course, you can also use any of the ‘high heat’ oils.
Low heat and finishing oils (under 300℉) - Unrefined and extra virgin oils like olive oil, coconut oil, and unrefined peanut and flax seed oils.

Secondly, what’s the flavor of the nation?
Mediterranean - for those delicious pasta dishes, pizzas, and delightful salads, the oils you want to use (especially to drizzle right at the end) are olive oil, oregano oil, or fig oil
Asian - dishes that have exotic flavor profiles need an exotic oil. Coconut, grapeseed, sesame, and peanut oil
Indian - ghee is most commonly used for flavor, otherwise coconut, or palm oil
European - butter! Oils used generally have no flavor as the flavor is derived from other ingredients, so vegetable or canola oil, vegetable shortening, or lard are most popular. Truffle oils are also used.

Drizzle, Away!
These are unrefined oils that have been cold pressed and add wonderful flavor right at the end before everybody dives in. Olive oil, truffle oil, and apricot oil are a few of my favorites - but you can also make up your own. Flavored oils have become wildly popular in recent years.