Love you can taste.

Sarah from Vinal Bakery proposed Maple Pecan cookies for this week (that's her in the photo). The Maple Syrup is harvested from her family home in New Hampshire where her dad has been sugaring as a hobby since the 1970's. Its a labor of love, done the old fashioned way with buckets, not the plastic tubing you see in larger operations. They have a small harvest, yielding 6-8 gallons a year and  the results are heaven. Plus, its fun. Sarah says: "We love doing it as a spring activity - gets us outside after a winter cooped up. We all love sitting around the fire drinking beer with friends while watching the sap boil. A New England tradition."

Pure maple syrup, like Sarah's Dad's, is made from boiling the sap of a Maple tree. Nothing more. Big name syrups like Aunt Jemima have corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup and caramel color as their top ingredients, not a drop of real syrup to be found. (also, what the heck is a "caramel color" and where do you find that in nature? Is there a Caramel Color Tree the Quaker Oats guy climbs to pluck off a few and throw it in the basket alongside the fruit from the Sodium Hexametaphosphate Bush?)

Real ingredients matter and they make beautiful products like these cookies.All that tradition and love translates into a well-crafted and delicious product. We hope you love them.


A SPECIAL WELCOME TO THE SOUTH SHORE

Welcome to those of you who are joining us from the South Shore. Many of you are aware that Pam Denholm has recently decided to close South Shore Organics after lovingly serving her customers for more than 7 years.  We are honored to carry Pam's mission forward and are delighted that you've decided to join us. We're planning a more formal announcement in the near future, but wanted to give you a nod, a squeeze, and a warm welcome to Family Dinner. 


WHAT'S IN THE BAG?

HALF SHARE

Omnivore Protein - Pollock and Monkfish Cheeks from Red's Best; Eggs from Brookford Farm
Pescatarian Protein - Pollock and Monkfish Cheeks from Red's Best; Eggs from Brookford Farm
Vegetarian Protein - Vegan Pulled Pork from Plant Deli; Eggs from Brookford Farm

Fruits and Veggies - Ruby Red Chard from Pete's Greens; Micro Kale from Clark Farm; Pink Lady Apples from Apex Orchards, Sweet Potatoes from Busa Farm
Grains - Garlic Focaccia from Iggy's Bread
Special Treat - Maple Pecan Cookies from Vinal Bakery

WHOLE SHARE

Omnivore Protein - Pollock and Monkfish Cheeks from Red's Best; Chorizo from Feather Brook Farms; Eggs from Brookford Farm
Pescatarian Protein - Salmon Filets, Pollock and Monkfish Cheeks from Red's Best; Eggs from Brookford Farm
Vegetarian Protein - Vegan Pulled Pork from Plant Deli; Eggs from Brookford Farm

Fruits and Veggies -  Ruby Red Chard from Pete's Greens; Micro Kale from Clark Farm; Pink Lady Apples from Apex Orchards; Butternut Squash, Mint Sprigs and Sweet Potatoes from Busa Farm; Onions from Brookford Farm
Grains - Garlic Focaccia from Iggy's Bread
Special Treat - Maple Pecan Cookies from Vinal Bakery


RECIPES

Monkfish Cheeks: This is an often (foolishly!) overlooked part of the fish. It's buttery, delectable and we fight over them when we have a whole fish.  At home they make an elegant appetizer or a simple quick lunch. Pat them dry, sprinkle with a dash of salt and pepper (and anything you have on hand; Old Bay? Curio Spices? Go for it.) and put them in your hot cast iron. But just as Ace of Base's 1994 anthem says "Don't Turn Around". Don't walk away, they only need 40-60 seconds per side. Serve with lightly dressed kale greens, some grilled focaccia and a crisp glass of white.

Monkfish Cheeks with Chorizo and Garlic: Kicking it up a notch with the Chorizo from the whole shares, or maybe for the freezer meat hoarders among us.  Serve over rice, pasta or along side sweet potatoes. 

Sweet Potatoes and Mint: This is a somewhat unexpected couple. Sweet Potatoes and Mint? The freshness bright bite of the mint adds a lovely dimension to the meaty sweet potato. If you have yogurt on hand the sauce is a nice addition. Totally possible to omit and still have a lovely plate if you include a squeeze of citrus and a pinch of Maldon salt at the end.

Pan Seared Pollock with Swiss Chard: Fine. It's snowing in April. But we can still cook and eat like it's Spring. Chard is starting to come out of the greenhouses and we are thrilled for its return. Chard can take a char in a cast iron or wilt down a little more with this delicate braise. (See what we did there?)

Vegan Pulled Pork Scramble: Plant Deli serves up some serious flavor with this vegan meat substitute. We hear the veggie heads love it. What about a Pulled Pork Sweet Potato Boat? Or a pulled pork hash for Sunday Brunch. Your friends and your local bovines, will thank you.


TIPS AND TRICKS

One Fish, Two Fish...
When we have more than one variety of fish in the shares, we get frequent questions about trips to the freezer. Generally we advise that the more delicate fish should be eaten first, and the flakier white fish can survive the tundra along side your frozen pizza and Talenti Ice Cream (Our dog, Frank, goes bonkers for the Tahitian Vanilla Bean.)

Our friend Jimmy Rider, founder of the Hooked Fish Shop in the soon to be opened Bow Street Market (Somerville, MA), has another suggestion. He suggests eating the Pollock first because it has slightly more oil content than other white fish. That oil content doesn't love the freezer and the cold will alter its taste. If you have to freeze one, start with the cheeks. They will take to a sear nicely even after freezing. Or heck, live a little. Eat them both at once.

When Bow Street Market opens, you'll be able to visit Jimmy for delightful fish sandwiches, chowders, poke bowls and more. He's a great guy with delicious food.